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MCC Applications

MCC Applications

In general multi-column chromatographic systems are typically used for bulk separations (oils ...) or end product purification (e.g. chiral separations) and are sometimes used in series (first bulk, than fine).

Due to their outstanding flexibility our Octave® systems can be used for:

  • Classic FPLC two-step separations in one device
  • Tech-transfer from batch to continuous (including injection and separation on a single column, eluate fractionation, and fractionation analytics)
  • Process development
  • Process transfer (upscaling) of continuous methods
  • Manufacturing of biological probes under GMP-conditions

Year    Title    Authors   
2022 Protein L Chromatography Process Transfer for the
Continuous Purification of Fab-Fragments
Tosoh Bioscience Applications Team Download application note



Year    Title    Authors    
2022 Two-Step Monoclonal Antibody Purification Using a Multi-Column Continuous Chromatography Platform Tosoh Bioscience Applications Team Download application note



Year    Title    Authors    Journal/Conference
2018 Continuous vs Batch Processing: Pilot Scale Antibody Purification A collaboration between Catalent Biologics and Semba Biosciences Webinar

ABSTRACT:

We describe a case study that directly compared a multi-column chromatography (MCC) process vs an optimized batch chromatography process for Protein A capture of a human monoclonal antibody at 100 g scale. The multi-column process was performed using a Semba ProPD™ Chromatography System with eight 50-ml columns (400 ml total resin volume). The batch process was performed with a GE AKTAprocess™ system with one 2.46 L column. Identical process solutions and protocols were used in each case. Each process was performed with two different Protein A resins; Toyopearl® AF rProtein A HC 650F and MabSelect SuRe™. Results demonstrated that the MCC process productivities were 3.3- and 3.1-fold higher with Toyopearl and MabSelect SuRe, respectively, than the corresponding batch processes. Buffer volumes used were 40% and 27% less, respectively, than the corresponding batch processes. When modeled at clinical scale (i.e. 2000 L) the MCC process represents savings of more than $800,000 in initial Protein A resin cost and 18 days per suite per year.

Catalent Webinar »

Comparing Continuous And Batch Processing In Downstream Purification »

Year    Title    Authors    Journal/Conference
2017 Process Considerations for Protein A Capture, Virus Inactivation, and Linked Polishing Steps in Multi-Column Continuous Purification of Monoclonal Antibodies Grabski, A., Wessel, W., Van Oosbree, T., Schirmer, E., Mierendorf, R. Integrated Continuous Biomanufacturing III Symposium

ABSTRACT:

Multi-column continuous chromatography (MCC) offers significant economic advantages over traditional batch methods for purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including increased resin capacity utilization, smaller columns, reduced buffer consumption, and faster process time. The Protein A capture step is a primary target to apply MCC due to its high cost, which is driven even higher as improvements in upstream processing have produced a steady increase in mAb titers. In this study we consider the key factors in designing an MCC process that optimizes productivity. Process design begins with determination of the feed duration, which is governed by the mAb titer, column dimensions, residence time, binding capacity, and flow properties of the resin. Use of 3 columns in the capture zone enables efficient utilization of the resin even at short residence times, thereby increasing productivity. Column number and resin volume are optimized to relieve scheduling constraints experienced at high mAb titer while maximizing cycling for single use columns. Productivities exceeding 100 g mAb/L resin/h were achieved loading concentrated CHO expressed feed stream using a Semba ProPD™ System and 8-column MCC Protein A affinity process. Flow-through and bind-elute polishing steps including ion exchange and mixed mode have been converted from batch to MCC toward realization of a completely continuous biomanufacturing platform.

Year    Title    Authors    Journal/Conference
2016 Optimizing Productivity of Multi-Column Continuous Chromatography for Processing High-titer Feed Streams Mierendorf, R., Van Oosbree, T., Hammer, B., Grabski, A. BioProcess International West 2016 Symposium

ABSTRACT:

We investigated a practical approach to optimizing a continuous Protein A capture process. Static and dynamic binding capacities were determined for various Protein A resins in single-column experiments followed by modeling the process in various column and flow configurations using a simple Excel-based tool. Models were tested using a lab-scale Octave® System. Residence time is the key driver of productivity and is subject to several constraints including flow velocity (pressure drop), mass transfer (dynamic capacity), and column number (process time). The highest productivities were obtained using 0.5 min residence time with 3 columns in the capture zone. For example, 97 g/L resin/h was achieved with high purity and recovery using TOYOPEARL® AF rProtein A HC resin (Tosoh Bioscience). Optimal performance at low residence times requires adsorbents having high DBC and low pressure drop and MCC equipment that accommodates multiple process configurations. These considerations are important to maximize process economy at production scale at any feed titer.

Year    Title    Authors    Journal/Conference
2016 Multi-Column Continuous Chromatography for Protein A Capture and Orthogonal Polishing of Monoclonal Antibodies Grabski, A., Van Oosbree, T., Hammer, B., Mierendorf, R. PREP 2016 Symposium

ABSTRACT: 

We have used a lab-scale SMB/MCC instrument (Semba Octave® 10 System) to develop and optimize a continuous Protein A capture process. Here we present productivity data with five commercial Protein A adsorbents using feedstocks at 5 and 7.5 g/L mAb titers. With an 8-column process and appropriate capture resins, productivities approaching 100 g mAb/L resin/day were achieved with 7.5 g/L feedstock. In addition, we have examined hydroxyapatite and anion exchange as orthogonal MCC polishing steps for aggregate removal and concurrent depletion of impurities following Protein A capture. Results indicate that a completely continuous downstream process, including only two chromatographic steps, may be possible to further increase efficiency and reduce cost in mAb biomanufacture.